SHERLOCK HOLMES

Review by: Christopher Haskell


RELEASE DATE
DECEMBER 25, 2009
DIRECTED BY
GUY RITCHIE
WRITTEN BY
MICHAEL ROBERT JOHNSON
ANTHONY PECKHAM
SIMON KINBERG
LIONEL WIGRAM
STUDIO
WARNER BROS. PICTURES
BUDGET
$90 MILLION

ACTION | ADVENTURE | CRIME | MYSTERY | THRILLER
129 MINUTES
RATED PG-13
(for intense sequences of violence and action, some startling images and a scene of suggestive material)

Sherlock Holmes was never so bad ass. Great performances all around. Robert Downey Jr. obviously carries the film to heights I do not believe any other actor could carry such a film. This part was made for him. Mark Strong stuck out as well. I almost wish he could have been in something a little more serious as this film was too playful for such a strong villain, but I think that edginess he brought helped make this film more than just a comedic action film.

The action sequences stole the show for me. The thought-process behind Holmes’ fighting stances before they happened were great. With slow motion kicks and punches, the blows of the fist actually meant something. Guy Ritchie’s directing style is just phenomenal and really sticks out from any other film.

One of my favorite parts of this film as a package is the great posters made for the film with each character given its own poster. The last time I saw this used effectively was The Hangover. The styling of the posters did their job in getting me excited to see this film and would be a great collection for any fan of this film.

The biggest downfall for this film lied in its misinterpretation of Rachel McAdams part in this film compared to the film’s trailer. In the trailer, McAdams is represented as a strong, feminine woman. The trailer seduced me into expecting to see McAdams clad in a corset take control of a situation with Holmes so I anticipated this throughout the entire film and felt cheated at the conclusion of the film. I understand that trailers are made before the final cuts of the film, but why replace that moment of the film with a short, unnecessary sequence, making McAdams simply an unnecessary character throughout the entire film.

Overall, Sherlock Holmes hits its mark in creating a unique experience, which will appeal to fans and newcomers of the stories alike.

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