Release Date
September 27, 2013
Director
Ron Howard
Screenplay
Peter Morgan
Distributed By
Universal Pictures
Budget
$54 million
Action, Biography, Drama, History, Sport
Rated R for sexual content, nudity, language, some disturbing images and brief drug use
123 minutes

Rush

Rivalry is key in Ron Howard’s “Rush”, pitting two amazing performances against one another, from Chris Hemsworth and the all-but-unknown Daniel Brühl, and creating the highlight of the film. The element that tends to sway audiences away from the film is its root in Formula 1 racing, which is not so popular here in the states, but “Rush” is as much about Formula 1 racing as “A Beautiful Mind” is about economics. Both are American bio-pics, directed by Ron Howard, but these strong elements are merely backdrops for the outstanding performances and a means to display some high octane, tension building moments between the two leads. Chris Hemsworth plays the suave party boy James Hunt. In Formula 3, he’s a machine at taking first place and taking home the girls. That’s until he meets Niki Lauda, played by Daniel Brühl, who is a machine in his own right, with an ability to modify cars that gives him a distinct advantage.

“Rush” follows their epic rivalry from racing in the minor leagues to being the most talked about enemies ever in the sport of Formula 1. Every moment you see them face off on-screen is a enigmatic moment that keeps you begging for more. Depicting these real life men and their lives outside of racing as well, Olivia Wilde, Alexandra Maria Lara, and Christian McKay all provide memorable supporting performances, with Wilde and McKay being heavily underutilized. Although strong performances, it’s hard to see these men getting any Oscar buzz, while Howard may prove fruitful in his involvement, building a significant stage for this real life sportsmanship to play out. For those that avoid this film because of its racing ties, I feel sorry for, as this will be remembered as one of the strongest adult dramas of the year.

 

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