“THE POST”
Amy Pascal, Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger



Director: Steven Spielberg
Writers: Liz Hannah & Josh Singer
Cinematography: Janusz Kamiński
Editor: Nick Houy
Composer: John Williams
Distributor: 20th Century Fox
Release Date: December 22, 2017
Run-time: 116 minutes


FILM SYNOPSIS: In 1971, Washington Post owner Kay Graham, the first female publisher of a major newspaper, and executive editor Ben Bradlee debate whether they should publish the top-secret, politically sensitive Pentagon Papers. Facing certain legal action, the pair must decide if their duty to inform the public is more important than protecting their careers and the paper itself.


The pairing of Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” and Meryl Streep at this year’s Academy Awards is fitting, as it seems that any time Spielberg does a film, it gets nominated for Best Picture an every time Meryl Streep performs in something, she gets nominated for an acting award. Now, in a year where nothing else from the film got nominated, those two still got nominations. Not say that “The Post” is not an excellent film, which I feel that it is, even going as far as to say it is one of my favorite films of 2017, but the Academy just seems to eat these things up. Most of the time, Spielberg’s films land a little bit more, like “War Horse,” which was nominated for Best Picture along with five other nominations, while “Bridge Of Spies” was nominated for Best Picture as well as five other nominations, including an eventual win for Best Supporting Actor Mark Rylance. So for “The Post” to get in only for Best Picture and Best Actress in a Leading Role is kind of a tell to the popularity of these two involved. Perhaps “The Post” came out a little bit too late in the year for it to gain any traction, as many films that are released as Oscar contenders so late rarely make the cut. But had the Academy really loved the film, I feel like Tom Hanks would have gotten a nomination, the Screenplay could have made the cut, and even the editing, which was truly one of the best parts of the film, would have been acknowledged. Instead, here were are, with two nominations.

If there’s one film that would be easy to discount from the Best Picture pool, it would be “The Post.” It has no other major awards attached to it. No directing or screenplay, no technical awards of any kind. It does have the PGA guild nomination going for it, but it lacks the DGA and SAG Ensemble nominations and for that, it would have to overcome so many other films with all the right accolades behind them, to come out the winner, and it just feels like too much of a long shot. Even “Darkest Hour” as more going for it, despite many believing it shouldn’t have gotten a Best Picture nomination. It has the Best Actor in a Leading Role nomination going to Gary Oldman, who will likely win, as well as cinematography and makeup and two other awards. What I do feel is that the Academy decided to push that film instead of “The Post.” Again, maybe that’s because “Darkest Hour” came out around Thanksgiving while “The Post” waited until Christmas, but whatever the reason, do not expect “The Post” to win this category.

Meryl Streep continues to add to her record number of Academy Award nominations, now finding herself with twenty-one. The next closest actress is Katherine Hepburn with twelve nominations, however, she has four wins where Streep only has three… only… That being said, this will not be the year that Meryl ties Hepburn. This year likely belongs to either Saoirse Ronan for “Lady Bird” or Frances McDormand for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and in my personal opinion, I think Meryl is lucky to have even gotten a nomination. Not only was her film not pushed like many thought it might be, but Jessica Chastain in “Molly’s Game” seemed like a safer bet to get a nomination. The Academy normally loves Chastain as well, but this year, the love for Streep overpowered. Streep does carry “The Post” nicely. And other actress might have been out-shined by Hanks’ performance and could have easily fallen into the background of the film, but Streep stands front and center and even though she does not have a huge character arc, she does have some subtle moments that are huge. However, with the landscape of the year, Meryl and her film are fairly close to the bottom of the barrel as far as being able to pull off any wins this year.


PREVIOUS NOMINATIONS

STEVEN SPIELBERG
YEAR FILM AWARD CATEGORY
1977 (50th) “Close Encounters Of The Third Kind” Nominated Best Directing
1981 (54th) “Raiders Of The Lost Ark” Nominated Best Directing
1982 (55th) “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial” Nominated Best Directing
Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
1985 (58th) “The Color Purple” Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
1986 (59th) n/a Won Irvin G. Thalberg Memorial Award
1993 (66th) “Schindler’s List” Won Best Directing
Won Best Picture (Producer)
1998 (71st) “Saving Private Ryan” Won Best Directing
Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
2005 (78th) “Munich” Nominated Best Directing
Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
2006 (79th) “Letters From Iwo Jima” Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
2011 (84th) “War Horse” Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
2012 (85th) “Lincoln” Nominated Best Directing
Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
2015 (88th) “Bridge Of Spies” Nominated Best Picture (Producer)
AMY PASCAL
NONE
EVELYN O’NEILL
YEAR FILM AWARD CATEGORY
2015 (88th) “Bridge Of Spies” Nominated Best Picture (Producer)


MERYL STREEP
“Katharine Graham”


CHARACTER SYNOPSIS: Meryl Streep portrays the publisher of The Washington Post, Kay Graham, who must overcome her self-doubt while deciding whether to publish the Pentagon Papers at a critical juncture in the paper’s history.


 

MERYL STREEP
YEAR FILM AWARD CATEGORY
1978 (51st) “The Deer Hunter” Nominated Best Actress in a Supporting Role
1979 (52nd) “Kramer Vs. Kramer” Won Best Actress in a Supporting Role
1981 (54th) “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1982 (55th) “Sophie’s Choice” Won Best Actress in a Leading Role
1983 (56th) “Silkwood” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1985 (58th) “Out Of Africa” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1987 (60th) “Ironweed” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1988 (61st) “A Cry In The Dark” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1990 (63rd) “Postcards From The Edge” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1995 (68th) “The Bridges of Madison County” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1998 (71st) “One True Thing” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
1999 (72nd) “Music Of The Heart” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
2002 (75th) “Adaptation” Nominated Best Actress in a Supporting Role
2006 (79th) “The Devil Wears Prada” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
2008 (81st) “Doubt” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
2009 (82nd) “Julie & Julia” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
2011 (84th) “The Iron Lady” Won Best Actress in a Leading Role
2013 (86th) “August: Osage County” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role
2014 (87th) “Into The Woods” Nominated Best Actress in a Supporting Role
2016 (89th) “Florence Foster Jenkins” Nominated Best Actress in a Leading Role



PACIFIC GLENDALE

VIEWED: Saturday
January 27th, 2018

39

37

Films Left Days Left

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s